Turbocharger Accumulator

Turbocharger Accumulator

Over several years Columbus Diesel Motorsports has been reporting blueing of the turbine shaft after disassembly of the high performance tractor pulling turbochargers at the time of rebuild. We originally thought the shaft was turning blue because the turbine what had been ran hot. A material will hold its discoloration from heat even after it returns to ambient temperatures. There are reference charts to determine what the temperature was that caused the discoloration if the material makeup is known. We started to monitor the exhaust temperature more closely over the history of a season and determined during a run the turbine shaft was not seeing high enough exhaust temperature to blue the shaft. We then looked at shutdown and discovered that hot soak is when the temperatures would skyrocket and would be high enough to turn the shaft blue. So what we concluded was if you can keep the tractor running at the end of the run for at least 5 minutes the shaft would not turn blue. If the tractor stops running at the end of a run and cannot be restarted or it is during an indoor pull, then you will need an alternate way of pressure feeding the turbo. Along with several other builders we have devised a plan to the problem- an accumulator. A very common sense approach but something every puller should think about, especially with the indoor pulling season approaching. We have set up our accumulator in a kit with a check valve so when the oil supply goes away the accumulator only provides oil to the turbocharger. With turbochargers in excess of $5500.00 a $450.00 accumulator is a cheap insurance package in my book. Just my thoughts. Thanks for Reading

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